People Are Obsessed With Two Cats Co-Parenting Their Kittens - petsitterbank

People Are Obsessed With Two Cats Co-Parenting Their Kittens

For as chaotic and exhausting as social media can be, there is something most people can agree on: the internet was made for cats. Case in point? These two mama cats, who have captured the hearts of everyone with their co-parenting strategy of raising their kittens.

Redditor Lindseyh911 posted a photo of the two mom cats, named Clementine and Cloud, with both their litters snuggled safely between both of them. “Co-parenting at its best!” the Redditor captioned the photo.

“[Two] Mamas who love and feed whichever kitten is closest,” the Redditor concluded the caption.

Clemetine’s kittens are six weeks old and referred to as “toddlers,” while Cloud’s kittens are two weeks old, aka “jelly beans.” The Redditor confirmed in the comments that the two litters get along, noting that they mostly “just snuggle togetherr for naps, the jelly beans don’t really play yet.”

The adorable portrait quickly racked up 34,000 upvotes — and it’s so cute and logical that it’s hard not to start looking at duplexes to buy with your best friend.

Other Redditors added their own stories of kitty co-parenting.

“This happened to a couple of my cats too, three of them all had kittens within two weeks. Mamas were just casually swapping babies all the time,” said one.

“When I was a kid, we had 2 cats give birth within the same week, and one cat mom was not interested in being a mom, so the other took care of allllll the kittens. It’s so sweet how cats will take care of kittens that aren’t their own. 😭,” added another.

Clementine and Cloud’s parenting strategy isn’t unique, thought. In the wild, two mother cats will sometimes nest together so one can hunt while the other watches the brood, according to Cat Watch Newsletter.

“It is common for cats to co-parent. Co-parenting is when two animals work together to care for their young. Co-parenting has been observed in a variety of different animal species, including lions, gorillas and dolphins,” animal behaviorist Sarah-Jane White told Newsweek.

Who else is ready to start an all-mom commune?

“Cats often form close bonds with their littermates, and those bonds can last well into adulthood. Cats that co-parent typically share responsibilities such as cleaning, feeding, and protecting kittens. believe that co-parenting offers many benefits to both parents and kittens, including a greater chance of survival.”

There are even examples of cross-species adoptions, which has puzzled biologists since it goes beyond the need to ensure evolutionary success of the species. Maybe the old adage “it takes a village to raise a child” applies to not just humans, but the animal world as well.

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