Pet-owners angry over rise in incidents of domestic cats being spray painted across Wangaratta - petsitterbank

Pet-owners angry over rise in incidents of domestic cats being spray painted across Wangaratta

Spate of cats are mysteriously SPRAY-PAINTED by mystery fiend in an Aussie town – as furious pet-owners demand the culprit come forward: ‘It’s disgusting’

  • Spate of cases where cats are being spray painted in Wangaratta, Victoria
  • MP believes enforcement of animal cruelty laws is drastically underfunded
  • Calls for the Government to take responsibility for animal abuse in this state

Pet owners are up in arms after a series of cats were spray-painted in a bizarre spate of attacks in a regional area.

The attacks, which occurred near the town of Wangaratta, Victoria, saw the household pets brazenly sprayed with aerosol paint.

The issue has sparked concern from a leading animal rights advocate, who says not enough is being done by governments to fight animal cruelty.

Emma Hurst, a member of NSW Legislative Council, said: ‘It is disgusting that a member of the public would harm an animal in this way.’

These domestic cats (pictured) have fallen victim to a spate of spray painting attacks throughout the Wangaratta region in Victoria

Emma Hurst (pictured) of the NSW Animal Justice Party slammed the move as disgusting.  She believes the enforcement of animal cruelty laws is drastically underfunded in NSW

Emma Hurst (pictured) of the NSW Animal Justice Party slammed the move as disgusting. She believes the enforcement of animal cruelty laws is drastically underfunded in NSW

She argued the enforcement of animal cruelty laws is ‘drastically underfunded’ by the state government.

Ms Hurst claimed the animal protection enforcement bodies in NSW receive less than half a million dollars a year to uphold animal cruelty rules.

‘That’s less than $500,000 to protect every animal in NSW,’ she said.

Ms Hurst said the lack of funding made it difficult for these charities to respond to, investigate and prosecute every act of animal cruelty. Hotlines aren’t being staffed 24/7, she said.

Ms Hurst said ‘spray paints and dyes are toxic, and can be very harmful to animals especially when sprayed into the face, eyes, nose and mouth.’

‘In NSW it is an offense to commit an act of cruelty on an animal – this includes any act which unnecessarily inflicts pain on an animal.’

‘Anyone who sees evidence of animal cruelty should immediately report it to the police, the RSPCA, or the Animal Welfare League NSW.’

The incident comes after a similar incident involving a white cockatoo spray-painted green in June last year.

A green cockatoo, believed to be spray-painted, was spotted at Campbelltown Train Station in Sydney

A green cockatoo, believed to be spray-painted, was spotted at Campbelltown Train Station in Sydney

The green bird was with a flock of about 30 cockatoos

A pink cockatoo (left) was spotted in the south-Sydney suburb of Menai in 2017

A pink cockatoo (left) was spotted in the south-Sydney suburb of Menai in 2017

Bruno Bouchet saw the bird in a flock of about 30 cockatoos at Campbelltown Train Station in Sydney’s south-west in June last year.

Colorful cockatoos have been spotted around Sydney in recent previous years, but painting or dyeing a bird in NSW could put you behind bars for six months.

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