Want to refresh your furnishings? Four key fabric trends for 2022 - petsitterbank

Want to refresh your furnishings? Four key fabric trends for 2022

Sumptuous color and embossed velvets add a fanciful vibe - a key trend for 2022. The Plaza collection of textured velvets from Warwick Fabrics, warwick.co.nz.

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Sumptuous color and embossed velvets add a fanciful vibe – a key trend for 2022. The Plaza collection of textured velvets from Warwick Fabrics, warwick.co.nz.

Carefree, elementary, fanciful and worldly – ​​check out the key furnishing fabrics trends for 2022.

care free

This trend has two sides – a playful optimistic look that inspires us to forget the trials of the past few years, and a comforting, neutral palette to make us feel free from worry.

The first uses fresh colors like pinks, greens, blues and mauves along with pretty prints that come with an energetic, positive vibe. Says Lucy Ovenden of James Dunlop Textiles: “The Pantone color of the year, Very Peri, is having a surprising influence, allowing soft lilac and mauve to arrive refreshed in a crisp, modern way.”

The second look centers around serene, calming interiors in a neutral color palette with soft ethereal fabrics. Linda Abbott of Martha’s Furnishing Fabrics points to styles that appeal to the senses with dimension and soft textures; also woolen fabrics with connotations of homeland comfort and spring.

Left: Chair in Parissi in Olive and sofa in Orleans in Tapioca both from Warwick Fabrics, warwick.co.nz.  Right: Allium in Orchid (sofa), Lilac and Bronze (cushions) all by Mokum from James Dunlop Textiles, jamesdunlop textiles.co.nz.

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Left: Chair in Parissi in Olive and sofa in Orleans in Tapioca both from Warwick Fabrics, warwick.co.nz. Right: Allium in Orchid (sofa), Lilac and Bronze (cushions) all by Mokum from James Dunlop Textiles, jamesdunlop textiles.co.nz.

Enigma Vine in Lichen from Martha's Furnishing Fabrics, marthas.co.nz.  Allium in Orchid (sofa), Lilac and Bronze (cushions) all by Mokum from James Dunlop Textiles, jamesdunlop textiles.co.nz.

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Enigma Vine in Lichen from Martha’s Furnishing Fabrics, marthas.co.nz. Allium in Orchid (sofa), Lilac and Bronze (cushions) all by Mokum from James Dunlop Textiles, jamesdunlop textiles.co.nz.

Elementary

Ever-popular botanical prints are on pause for now as other nature-inspired, more elemental colors and patterns come to the fore. The muted colors seen in nature – sky blues, cloudy whites, leafy greens, muddy browns – are strong, says Suz Tonascia of Bolt of Cloth, along with clay and sand tones. Patterning and textures range from the striations of stone, to coral and kelp, woven effects and even the dawn sky.

Briony Beckett of Harvey Furnishings agrees: “Neutral tones are taking more of a back seat moving forward, with colors close to nature such as deep greens, soft blues and warm brown tones coming to the forefront as people become more comfortable with bolder color again. ”

Says Kelly Henderson of Hemptech: “We have seen growth in customers looking for beautiful warm greens which work in so well with naturals. Layering natural shades from off-white to dark beiges will forever be a staple color scheme… and gives the opportunity to add color seasonally.”

Left: 100% linens from Martha's Furnishing Fabrics, marthas.co.nz.  Centre: Nembo in Clay & Gold by Fortuny from D&F, dandfnz.com.  Right: Remy recylced velvet in Emerald from Harvey Furnishings, harveyfurnishings.co.nz.

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Left: 100% linens from Martha’s Furnishing Fabrics, marthas.co.nz. Centre: Nembo in Clay & Gold by Fortuny from D&F, dandfnz.com. Right: Remy recylced velvet in Emerald from Harvey Furnishings, harveyfurnishings.co.nz.

Riffing off the natural trend is an increasing focus on the environment and sustainability as consumers prioritize healthy living, with use of linens, hemp, and recycled fibers and dyes to envelop our homes in durable and organic fabrics. Says Briony: “We are seeing a bigger focus on being more eco-conscious consumers, and with the ability to transform anything from coconut husk to milk into fabrics, the way forward is recycling. Linen-look, and even 100% linen, is no longer enough to keep the sustainability-focused customer shopping.”

Linen flax is one of the most sustainable raw materials in the world, says Linda Abbott of Martha’s Furnishing Fabrics. “From plant to fabric, linen is processed with the smallest possible ecological footprint, produces no waste and is biodegradable. It is also antibacterial, heat and moisture wicking, anti-static and naturally acoustic.”

Left: Reef in Oyster from Hemptech, hemptech.co.nz.  Centre: Rinnovo in Rain Forest from Hemptech.  Right: Taite cotton hemp fabric in White/Dark Blue from Bolt of Cloth, boltofcloth.co.nz.

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Left: Reef in Oyster from Hemptech, hemptech.co.nz. Centre: Rinnovo in Rain Forest from Hemptech. Right: Taite cotton hemp fabric in White/Dark Blue from Bolt of Cloth, boltofcloth.co.nz.

fanciful

This is a trend of strong, often oversized abstract patterns and those with an artistic slant using daubs and brushstrokes. Also geometric prints along with cut velvet, mesh, transparent fabrics and quilting. “It’s edgy, extreme and a little quirky,” says Alice Murphy of Warwick Fabrics. Says Anna Stewart of Schumacher stockist D&F: “2022 has taken velvets to an even more lush place… velvets have been influenced by majestic animals, comprised of exotic tigers, dragons and woodland creatures, and ornate architectural motifs, particularly contemporary chinoiserie.”

“Patterns are rounded and fluid with pops of vibrancy in color,” says Linda Abbott of Martha’s Furnishing Fabrics.

Says Lucy Ovenden of James Dunlop Textiles: “Textured fabrics are becoming ever bolder in a shift towards highly tactile fabrics with handmade and fur-like qualities in both synthetic and natural fibers. Bouclé continues to be relevant but is appearing in braver textures which can be layered alongside other striking weaves.”

Left: The Plaza collection of textured velvets from Warwick Fabrics, warwick.co.nz.  Right: Wisteria velvet in Navy by Sara Miller London from Charles Parsons, charlesparsons.co.nz.

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Left: The Plaza collection of textured velvets from Warwick Fabrics, warwick.co.nz. Right: Wisteria velvet in Navy by Sara Miller London from Charles Parsons, charlesparsons.co.nz.

Left: Rhapsody velvet in Jeweled from Bolt of Cloth, boltofcloth.co.nz.  Right: Mineral Creek in Iris from the Utopia collection by Christian Lacroix from IconRadford, iconradford.com.

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Left: Rhapsody velvet in Jeweled from Bolt of Cloth, boltofcloth.co.nz. Right: Mineral Creek in Iris from the Utopia collection by Christian Lacroix from IconRadford, iconradford.com.

Worldly

Inspired by a desire for re-emerging freedom, to travel and to escape, this worldly, eclectic theme has a refined bohemian feel with rich, dark and moody colours, as well as historic patterns, according to Warwick Fabrics. Colors might include merlot red, olive green, indigo, rich ocher and leathery brown while patterning is inspired by ikats, intricate Spanish tiles, Oriental lattice and cranes, and homespun weaves. Linda Abott of Martha’s Furnishing Fabrics points to the emergence of optimistic hues of deep-sea blues reflecting freedom, open spaces, and journeys farther afield.

Left: Karakum 20003 by Designs of the Time from James Dunlop Textiles, jamesdunloptextiles.com.  Right: Trellis in Charcoal (curtain), Athena in Indigo (centre cushion) and Geo in Indigo (throw) all by Porter & Stone from Charles Parsons, charlesparsons.co.nz.

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Left: Karakum 20003 by Designs of the Time from James Dunlop Textiles, jamesdunloptextiles.com. Right: Trellis in Charcoal (curtain), Athena in Indigo (centre cushion) and Geo in Indigo (throw) all by Porter & Stone from Charles Parsons, charlesparsons.co.nz.

Cala Marsal in Azul Ocre (on cushions) and Cala Murada in Ocre (on bed base and head) both from the Maiorica collection by Gastón Y Daniela from D&F, dandfnz.com.

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Cala Marsal in Azul Ocre (on cushions) and Cala Murada in Ocre (on bed base and head) both from the Maiorica collection by Gastón Y Daniela from D&F, dandfnz.com.

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There are only so many patterns and colors in the world. Our desire for vintage looks and an appreciation of designs from earlier eras have led to the updating of cult classics with fresh new colours. An example is new collections from Laura Ashley, stocked locally by Charles Parsons. These see the return of iconic prints, as well as new designs inspired by the rich heritage of the Laura Ashley archive with elegant florals, swirling patterns and contemporary digital prints on viscose linens, textured weaves and more.

Says Lucy Ovenden from James Dunlop Textiles: “At present our interiors are heavily influenced by a nostalgic appreciation for the colors and textures of the 1970s and the positive energy they inspire.”

Iconic brands are also extending beyond fabrics to homeware, tableware and accessories, for example, the bold retro brands of Orla Kiely and Marimekko.

Left: Unikko Ralli by Marimekko from Bolt of Cloth, boltofcloth.co.nz.  Right: LA Belvedere velvet in Pale Iris by Laura Ashley from Charles Parsons, charlesparsons.co.nz.

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Left: Unikko Ralli by Marimekko from Bolt of Cloth, boltofcloth.co.nz. Right: LA Belvedere velvet in Pale Iris by Laura Ashley from Charles Parsons, charlesparsons.co.nz.

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